Black doctor goes viral after asking to be celebrated 'in his hoodie'

Black A&E doctor reveals he’s noticed people ‘scared’ of him on the street and says: ‘If you celebrate me in my scrubs, don’t hate me in my hoodie’

  • Dr. Emeka Okorocha went viral after asking to be ‘celebrated in his hoodie too’ 
  • Nigerian-British doctor said he’s celebrated when people know he works for NHS
  • Says ‘ he’s hated’ when wearing hoodie, stopped by police 6 times while driving 

A black British doctor has gone viral on TikTok after asking his followers to respect him in his hoodie as well as his scrubs.

Dr. Emeka Okorocha, 27, from east London, shared a video asking his followers to ‘not hate him in his hoodie’ as protests against racial injustice sweep the world. 

The A&E doctor, who has a social media following of more than 139,000 appears to have started a trend, with a doctor in the US ‘dueting’ his video to do the same thing.

In the powerful clip, to the tune of Childish Gambino’s politically-charged ‘This is America’,  the doctor appears in his blue medical scrubs and then changes into a black Nike hoodie, writing: ‘If you celebrate me in my scrubs, don’t hate me in my hoodie.’

Speaking to FEMAIL, Dr Emeka said he came up with the idea after seeing a similar video of a black lawyer being asked to be celebrated while out of his suit.

‘It shows the contrast of how people see us in society,’ he explained.

‘I was in a group chat of doctors, and most of us are black. We were talking about it and all discussed how they when people in scrubs they’ll celebrate us, but when they see you in hoodie they fear you.

‘As we were talking I thought it was quite a good TikTok idea. 


Dr. Emeka Okorocha, 27, from east London, shared a video asking his followers to ‘not hate him in his hoodie’ as protests against racial injustice sweep the world

Speaking to FEMAIL, Dr Emeka (pictured at  Black Lives Matte protest in London) said he came up with the idea after seeing a similar video of a black lawyer being asked to be celebrated while out of his suit.

Discussing how he came up with the idea, Dr Emeka said: ”I was in a group chat of doctors, and most of us are black. We were talking about it and all discussed how they when people in scrubs they’ll celebrate us, but when they see you in hoodie they fear you.’

‘Everyone seems to love me in my scrubs and everyone is clapping for the NHS,  but if I wear a hoodie, as a 6ft6 black man in a affluent neighbourhood – they’ll be scared.’

The video has since had more than 820 thousand views on TikTok and more than 14 thousand on Instagram,  with it being shared by black doctors around the world. 

‘I’m so pleased about the post and the exposure and recognition it got,’ Dr Emeka added.

‘It can change a lot of views to how people react subconsciously when you see black man.

‘I’m celebrated and respected when I’m online for being a doctor, and people need to do that when I wear a hoodie. People need to not judge them give everyone a fair chance.

The video has since had more than 820 thousand views on TikTok and more than 14 thousand on Instagram with it being shared by black doctors around the world. Dr Emeka is pictured at work

Dr Emeka, pictured in PPE at work, added that recording the video was a ‘spur of the moment thing’ on the back of civil unrest and the Black Lives Matter movement

He added that recording the video was a ‘spur of the moment thing’ on the back of civil unrest and the Black Lives Matter movement. 

‘We look racism as a US problem in this country, but it’s here too.

‘I’ve had incidents. I’ve been driving car in nice neighbourhood, where my parents live, and been stopped  for quote-on-quote “driving too slow'”. 

‘When he [the police officer] saw my ID and saw it said “Doctor” his tone changed straight away.

‘Before I was just a black guy in my hoodie, and if I’m coming from playing football with friends in a black Nike hoodie that’s all they see me as.

Speaking to FEMAIL, Dr Emeka said: ‘I’m celebrated and respected when I’m online for being a doctor and people need to do that when I wear a hoodie. People need to not judge them give everyone a fair chance. He is pictured draped in a Nigerian flag at Notting Hill Carnival last year

‘I’ve been stopped five or six times by police. And never have anything been out of order. I’m just stopped just for suspicion, I’ve been told I looked like “someone who was reported in the area”.

‘If I’m in my car, police don’t know how tall or big I am am, but they’re stopping me for “fitting a description”.

Dr Emeka added that systematic racism in the police is an issue in the UK.  

‘People look at it as an US issue, because police here don’t have guns. They sweep institutional racism under the carpet. In terms of our safety they don’t have guns to stop us, they do still profile us.   

‘I didn’t think the video would be that big, but I looked at it back and didn’t think it would be that powerful – but thought it would an interesting way to show the two ways I’m seen by society.   

‘A lot of people around the world have seen it, it’s been as far and wide as Australia and New Zealand and duetted in lots of languages’.

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