Ronnie Wood's, 72, twins Alice and Gracie celebrate their 4th birthday

‘Happy 4th birthday!’ Ronnie Wood, 72, ensures his adorable twin daughters Alice and Gracie have fun as they celebrate turning 4 during lockdown

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They were denied a big princess party surrounded by lots of excitable friends.

But, Ronnie Wood’s twin daughters looked delighted all the same with their lockdown birthday celebrations on Saturday, enjoying a party at home in addition to a family day-trip to Ashridge House as they turned four.

Wearing their traditional birthday tops, emblazoned with their age, matching pink skirts and rainbow wellies, Alice and Gracie seemed to be having a ball in the garden.

Happy birthday! Ronnie Wood’s, 72, twin daughters looked delighted all the same with their lockdown birthday celebrations on Saturday, enjoying a party at home as they turned four

Wood, 72, posted a photograph of the giggling girls on social media, writing: ‘Happy 4th birthday to my beautiful Alice and Gracie.’

His third wife Sally, 42, who he married in 2012 after a six-month romance, also shared family snaps of the twins celebrating with a birthday cake each and huge helium balloons.

The girls were given matching pink bicycles for their birthday, which they tested – somewhat impractically – in their Disney princess dresses.

Ronnie seems to be making the most of life at home with his young family after the Rolling Stones’s No Filter tour, which was due to kick off in America in May, was postponed.

Marking the moment: Wood, 72, posted a photograph of the giggling girls on social media, writing: ‘Happy 4th birthday to my beautiful Alice and Gracie’

A cake each! His third wife Sally, 42, who he married in 2012 after a six-month romance, also shared snaps of the twins celebrating with a birthday cake each and huge helium balloons

Cute! The girls were given matching pink bicycles for their birthday, which they tested – somewhat impractically – in their Disney princess dresses

As well as his music career, Ronnie has had a busy personal life with three wives and six children. 

Ronnie married actress and producer Sally in 2012. The couple welcomed their twin daughters, Gracie and Alice, in 2016. 

The singer married first wife Krissy Findlay in 1971 and divorced in 1978. They share one son, Jesse, 43, who is now married to presenter Fearne Cotton. 

Ronnie was then married to former model Jo for 26-years before their separation and subsequent divorce in 2011.

The former couple are parents to three children; Leah, 41, an accomplished singer, Jamie, 45, and Tyrone, 36.   

Family outing: The twins also enjoyed a family day-trip to Ashridge House with their parents

Family: Ronnie married his third wife Sally Humphreys, 42, in 2012

Earlier this month, Ronnie admitted that he ‘never got beyond 29’ in his head and that he feels ‘cheated’ over life going so quickly in his new documentary.

The Rolling Stones legend also discussed beating lung cancer in 2017 after 54 years of smoking 25 to 30 cigarettes a day and claimed that it was a ‘get out of jail free card’.

Ronnie shared a teaser clip of the feature-length programme, called Ronnie Wood: Somebody Up There Likes Me, to his Twitter ahead of its June debut on Sky Arts. 

A case of the ex: Ronnie was married to former model Jo for 26-years before their separation and subsequent divorce in 2011 (pictured in happier times) 

Friendly exes: Ronnie has Leah, 41, an accomplished singer, Jamie, 45, and Tyrone, 36, with ex Jo (Sally, Ronnie, Leah and Jo L-R pictured together in December) 

Children: The singer married first wife Krissy Findlay in 1971 and divorced in 1978. They share one son, Jesse, 43, who is now married to presenter Fearne Cotton (pictured in May 2019) 

In the video, Ronnie candidly spoke about turning 70 and admitted that it was ‘surreal’ as he didn’t expect time to pass him so quickly.

He said: ‘I never got beyond 29 in my head, you know, so to be 70 is just so weird. It’s like being in a [Salvador] Dalí painting. It’s very surreal to be 70 because I didn’t expect time to go so quickly, you feel almost cheated really.’

Ronnie also revealed that he had cancer cut out of his lung in 2017 after 54 years of ‘smoking for England’. He gave up cigarettes a ‘couple of years ago’. 

Candid: Earlier this month, Ronnie admitted that he ‘never got beyond 29’ in his head and that he feels ‘cheated’ over life going so quickly in his new documentary

Scary: The Rolling Stones legend also discussed beating lung cancer in 2017 after 54 years of smoking 25 to 30 cigarettes a day and claimed it was a ‘get out of jail free card’ (pictured in 1972) 

He said: ‘I smoked for England for 54 years. 25 to 30 [cigarettes] a day, at least, for 50 odd years.

‘So I got away with having it cut out of one lung, the cancer, luckily it just stayed there. They said: ‘We got rid of that and while we were there, we got rid of the emphysema on the top lobe of your lung.’ 

Emphysema is a condition which affects and damages the lungs, it can cause shortness of breath and creates larger air spaces. 

Ronnie continued: ‘They said, ‘Your lungs now are like you never smoked’, I went: ‘How is that for a get out of jail free card! Somebody up there likes me and somebody down here likes me too.” 

Teaser: Ronnie shared a teaser clip of the feature-length programme, called Ronnie Wood: Somebody Up There Likes Me, to his Twitter ahead of its June debut on Sky Arts


Time goes so quickly: In the video, Ronnie candidly spoke about turning 70 and admitted that it was ‘surreal’ as he didn’t expect time to pass him so quickly (pictured in 2012, left, and 1976, right) 

Reflecting on his life, he added: ‘When you think back, you think: ‘OK, yeah, I spent all that time very creatively.’ I wouldn’t change anything, unless if I could do it again with my eyes open, if I had to relive it.’ 

Ronnie Wood: Somebody Up There Likes Me is the first feature-length documentary chronicling the Rolling Stones rocker’s life.

The programme was screened at the London Film Festival last year and received critical acclaim.   

No more smoking! Ronnie also revealed that he had cancer cut out of his lung in 2017 after 54 years of ‘smoking for England’. He gave up cigarettes a ‘couple of years ago’ (pictured in 2010) 

Somebody Up There Likes Me will also see appearances from his Rolling Stones bandmates Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts. As well as former Faces bandmate Rod Stewart.  

While his wife Sally, singer Imelda May and artist Damien Hirst will also make cameos in the documentary. 

Somebody Up There Likes Me will document Ronnie’s rock and roll life from joining the music scene in the 1960s to working with the Jeff Beck Group, Faces and finally The Rolling Stones.  

Pals: Somebody Up There Likes Me will also see appearances from his Rolling Stones bandmates Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts (pictured in August 2019) 

The rocker will also candidly discuss his battle with drink, drugs and smoking in the feature-length programme.

During the documentary, Ronnie will play guitar and harmonica solos with it concluding with a performance of his 1975 single Breathe On Me. 

Talking about Somebody Up There Likes Me, the musician said: ‘I live my life to the full, no regrets. I never got past 29 in my head and since I’m still here, I guess somebody up there does like me! 

Way back when: Ronnie’s former Faces bandmate Rod Stewart will also make a cameo (pictured together in 2004) 

‘Every day I continue to be inspired by my family, music and art. With my painting I embrace my peaceful side, but then on the flipside I get to rock out. I’m privileged to continue to have so many great moments in my life.’ 

Philip Edgar Jones, Director Sky Arts, said: ‘Ronnie Wood is a peerless rock n roll guitar star, an accomplished painter and has led one fascinating life so far. 

‘So we’re incredibly pleased to be sharing his story in Someone up There Likes Me with our Sky Arts viewers.’ 

Ronnie Wood: Somebody Up There Likes Me will air on Saturday June 6 on Sky Arts. 

WHAT IS LUNG CANCER?  

Lung cancer is one of the most common and serious types of cancer. 

Around 47,000 people are diagnosed with the condition every year in the UK.

There are usually no signs or symptoms in the early stages of lung cancer, but many people with the condition eventually develop symptoms including:

– a persistent cough

– coughing up blood

– persistent breathlessness

– unexplained tiredness and weight loss

– an ache or pain when breathing or coughing

You should see a GP if you have these symptoms.

Types of lung cancer 

There are two main forms of primary lung cancer. 

These are classified by the type of cells in which the cancer starts growing. 

They are:

– Non-small-cell lung cancer. The most common form, accounting for more than 87 per cent of cases. 

– It can be one of three types: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma.

– Small-cell lung cancer – a less common form that usually spreads faster than non-small-cell lung cancer.

– The type of lung cancer you have determines which treatments are recommended.

Who’s affected

Lung cancer mainly affects older people. It’s rare in people younger than 40. 

More than four out of 10 people diagnosed with lung cancer in the UK are aged 75 and older.

Although people who have never smoked can develop lung cancer, smoking is the most common cause (accounting for about 72 per cent of cases). 

This is because smoking involves regularly inhaling a number of different toxic substances.

Treating lung cancer

Treatment depends on the type of mutation the cancer has, how far it’s spread and how good your general health is.

If the condition is diagnosed early and the cancerous cells are confined to a small area, surgery to remove the affected area of lung may be recommended.

If surgery is unsuitable due to your general health, radiotherapy to destroy the cancerous cells may be recommended instead.

If the cancer has spread too far for surgery or radiotherapy to be effective, chemotherapy is usually used.

There are also a number of medicines known as targeted therapies. 

They target a specific change in or around the cancer cells that is helping them to grow. 

Targeted therapies cannot cure lung cancer but they can slow its spread.

Source: NHS 

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