Lauren Pope goes into ‘pregnancy isolation’ and offers advice for mums to be

Lauren Pope has shared with fans that she is self isolating from home after announcing her pregnancy last week.

The mum-to-be had kept news she was expecting her first child with millionaire boyfriend Tony Keterman a closely guarded secret but eventually made the reveal with pictures of her sonogram and bump.

Days later as the coronavirus pandemic continues, Lauren has returned to social media to tell her followers how she's coping.

The TOWIE star looked in good spirits as she posted a very glamorous picture of her posed in front of her living room mirror.

Lauren, 37, had her hair crimped and nails manicured and showed off her blossoming bump in a white body suit and khaki trousers – but admitted she wasn't going anywhere.

"All dolled up & nowhere to go…Literally! Pregnancy isolation has officially begun," she said.

'What a strange time for us all, I’m going to be doing exactly what has been suggested & reduce contact as much as poss & it sounds like a lot of you are also doing the same."

She then urged concerned mums to message her to start a group conversation so they could help each other stay positive.

"Feel free to keep messaging if your worried or feeling alone, there are so many of you that haven’t even announced your pregnant yet so feel like you can’t talk to anyone else about what’s going on.

"I’ll try to repost as much up to date official info I come across over on my stories & of course keep replying to you on here…No better time to all pull together & be there for each other. Stay safe," she said.


Last week Lauren announced she was having her first child this year with boyfriend of a year Tony, 33.

After having a string of romances played out on reality show TOWIE in the past, Lauren admitted she was glad to have waited for the perfect person to start a family with,

"[I] never settled for anything less [than] I felt I deserved," said Lauren.

The excited star also gushed she was the 'happiest she's every been.'

"I [used] to stupidly think I would be considered old to get pregnant but the fertility experts I’ve spoken to have all told me that’s really not true. Just in case anyone needs to hear this right now."

This week pregnant women were added to the list of those more 'at risk' from coronavirus.

In an address from Downing Street, Public Health England chief medical officer Chris Whitty described the new guidance for those more at risk as "absolutely critical".

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) have released information for pregnant women during the outbreak.

What affect does the virus have on pregnant women?

While pregnant women have been added to the 'at risk' list, they do not appear to get more severely unwell than the rest of the population, say the RCOG.

While the RCOG say most pregnant women will experience only mild and moderate symptoms, they say the full affects are still unclear due to the virus being so new.

There are no reported deaths from coronavirus in pregnant women.

The RCOG say pregnant women who have other underlying conditions may feel more unwell from the virus.

What affect would a positive diagnosis have on my baby?

The RCOG says experts are in the very early stages of understanding how the virus works, but there is currently no evidence of an increased risk of miscarriage.

There is also no evidence the virus can pass to your developing baby in the womb and is therefore seen as unlikely a developing baby will suffer abnormalities, even if the mum has coronavirus.

On reports of babies born with symptoms of the virus in China, the RCOG say some of these babies have been born prematurely and it is "unclear" whether coronavirus caused this or the doctors made the decision for the baby to be born early because the woman was unwell.

If you have a suspected or confirmed case of coronavirus at the time your baby is born, the baby will be tested.

How can pregnant women reduce their risk of contraction?

The RCOG and the NHS maintain the most important thing pregnant women can do is to regularly and thoroughly was their hands.

They say hand washing should especially be done as soon as a woman comes from a public place to their home or place of work.

The government have advised pregnant women, along with others on the 'at risk' list to practice social distancing.

They have more information here on how to socially distance effectively.

Source: Read Full Article