You can now lie-flat and sleep on an economy flight – all thanks to Thomas Cook

If you struggle to sleep on long-haul flights, Thomas Cook Airlines might have the perfect solution for you.

The company are offering economy passengers on their planes a chance to lie back, relax and get some sleep on a bed in the sky.

As of today, Thomas Cook have launched their new ‘Sleeper Seat’ on long-haul routes such as from New York to San Fransisco, which transforms a row of three seats into a bed, so you can catch up on a spot of shut eye and arrive on holiday (or return home) feeling refreshed.

The Sleeper Seat measures 148.4cm long and 67cm deep and has a mattress that fits perfectly across the row.

Those in the seat are also provided with a pillow, fitted sheet, a head rest, amenity kit and a blanket. A seatbelt extension is also available while lying down.

The bed can be used however you wish – as a place to read, sleep, watch a film, listen to a podcast, or simply to have a good stretch out.

If no one is sitting in your row after take off, travellers can request the cabin crew transform their seats into a bed once the seatbelt signs go out, but there is a catch.

The Sleeper Seats have to be booked before travel and prices start from £200 one-way.

They are also only available for adults and children aged over 12.

Henry Sunley, Commercial Director at Thomas Cook Airlines says, “We always look for ways to innovate for our customers and Sleeper Seat is a UK first that we are really proud of.

"It is a fantastic way to transform your flying experience and enjoy some extra comfort when flying in Economy.”

He added: "It’s flexible too, as while only one person can use Sleeper Seat at a time, you can swap with other people in your group during the flight… but it’s entirely up to you if you want to share."

For more information visit www.thomascookairlines.com

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